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News Annual Scientific Meeting News Participants Program Posters Events Opening Reception ESO Agreement Signing Harley Wood Public Lecture ASA Conference Dinner Introduction To Machine Learning Prizes Bok Prize Charlene Heisler Prize Ellery Lectureship Harley Wood Lecture Louise Webster Prize Policies Sponsors Harley Wood Winter School

Bok Prize

Prize named for
Bart Jan Bok

Bart Jan Bok was Director of Mount Stromlo Observatory from 1957 to 1966. He energetically promoted the undergraduate and graduate study of astronomy in Australia and set up the Graduate School of Astronomy at the Australian National University. In addition to his many scientific achievements, he was also a talented populariser of astronomy and is particularly remembered for his entertaining broadcasts on ABC radio.

Astronomical Society of Australia's Annual Scientific Meeting

The Bok Prize is awarded annually by the Astronomical Society of Australia to recognise outstanding research in astronomy by an Honours student or eligible Masters student at an Australian university.

The prize consists of the Bok Medal together with an award of $500 and ASA membership for the following calendar year. The recipient is invited to present a paper on their research at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Astronomical Society of Australia, where the prize will be presented.

To be eligible for the Prize applicants must have been an Honours student or eligible Masters student at an Australian university (at 30 June in the year prior to the award), and completed their degree requirements in that same year. Their research must have been carried out in an area of astronomy or closely related field.

Eligible Masters students are those who have entered their Masters degree from a 3 year undergraduate degree. Students who completed an Honours year before entering the Masters degree are not eligible for the Bok prize.

For full information on the Bok Prize, see http://asa.astronomy.org.au/bok.php.

The 2017 Bok Prize is awarded to
Madeline Marshall

Awarded for the thesis, "Triggering Galactic Nuclei in Galaxy Clusters", completed at the University of Tasmania, supervised by Stanislav Shabala.

Marshall investigated a broad range of possible triggering mechanisms of AGN in galaxy clusters. She implemented semi-analytic models to follow the evolution of cluster galaxies and used these to determine the spatial distribution of AGN for specific triggering mechanisms which could be compared with observations.

Prize talk
Triggering AGN in galaxy clusters

Session 7, T29, Tue, 11 Jul, 9:15–9:45 a.m., Molonglo Theatre

Active galactic nuclei (AGN) play an important role in the regulation of star formation in their host galaxies and the larger scale environment. To develop a full understanding of the role of AGN, it is important to know how they are triggered. Using a semi-analytic galaxy evolution model, I investigate the predicted spatial distribution of AGN in clusters under the assumption that they are triggered by ram pressure effects. By comparing these simulated AGN to SDSS observations of relaxed clusters, I find that the observed AGN distribution can be reproduced well by ram pressure triggering, with triggering ram pressures consistent with those found to trigger star formation in hydrodynamical simulations. These findings may assist in the interpretation of cluster observations including deep multi-wavelength and integral field surveys.