Navigation News Annual Scientific Meeting Harley Wood Winter School Participants Program Events HWWS Bus - Sydney to Kioloa HWWS Bus - Canberra to Kioloa HWWS Bus - Kioloa to Canberra Policies Sponsors
News Annual Scientific Meeting Harley Wood Winter School News Participants Program Events HWWS Bus - Sydney to Kioloa HWWS Bus - Canberra to Kioloa HWWS Bus - Kioloa to Canberra Policies Sponsors
Now

Harley Wood Winter School – Program

Click on session headings to view the session; click on talk titles to view their abstracts.

Thu, 6 Jul | Fri, 7 Jul | Sat, 8 Jul | Sun, 9 Jul

Thu, 6 Jul

2:30–7:30 p.m. | 7:30–8:30 p.m. | 8:30–10:00 p.m.

Thu, 6 Jul, 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

HWWS Bus - Sydney to Kioloa

Registration required

2:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. @ Sydney Central Station, then Sydney Domestic Airport, on to ANU Kioloa Campus

A bus service from Sydney Domestic Aiport to Kioloa Campus has been organized by the Harley Wood Winter School LOC. Pick-up times and locations are as follows:

Depart Central Station @ 2.30pm
Depart Sydney Domestic Airport @ 3.30pm
Arrive Kioloa @ 7.30pm (approx)

Note that there will be no return ...

More info →

HWWS Bus - Canberra to Kioloa

Registration required

3:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. @ ANU University House, then Canberra Airport, to ANU Kioloa Campus

A bus service from ANU main campus to Kioloa Campus has be organized by the Harley Wood Winter School LOC. Bus times and pick-up locations are as follows:

Departs University House @ 3.30pm
Departs Canberra Airport @ 4.00pm
Arrives Kioloa @ 7pm (approx)

More info →

Registration

 

Thu, 6 Jul, 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Thu, 6 Jul, 8:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑


Fri, 7 Jul

9:00–10:30 a.m. | 10:30–11:00 a.m. | 11:00 a.m. –12:30 p.m. | 12:30–2:00 p.m. | 2:00–3:30 p.m. | 3:30–4:00 p.m. | 4:00–5:00 p.m. | 6:00–7:00 p.m. | 7:00–10:00 p.m.

Fri, 7 Jul, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Friday Morning (1)

T1, 9:00–10:30 a.m. — Exoplanets and solar systems
Jonti HORNER, University of Southern Queensland

Just over two decades ago, we entered the Exoplanet Era, with the discovery of the first planets orbiting distant, Sun-like stars. In the time since, the number of known exoplanets has soared, with more than 3,500 having being found to date. This explosion in the number of known planets has revolutionised our understanding of our place in the universe, and places us on the threshold of finally discovering the answer to the oldest question: Are We Alone?

Where once it was the sole planetary system we could study, the Solar system is now just one among many. Despite that, studies of the Solar system remain of critical importance. Only scant information is known for all other planetary systems, but we can study the Solar system in intricate and overwhelming detail.
In this talk, I will describe our journey from knowing just five planets in our own backyard, to understanding that planets are ubiquitous, most likely outnumbering stars in the cosmos by an order of magnitude. I will also look to the future, pointing to the programs that will likely drive the next revolution in planetary science - the dawn of the Exo-Earth Era, and the search for life elsewhere.

Fri, 7 Jul, 10:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Fri, 7 Jul, 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Friday Morning (2)

T2, 11:00 a.m. –12:30 p.m. — Gravitational waves and OzGrav
Letizia SAMMUT, Monash University

Gravitational waves were predicted by Einstein in 1915, one hundred years before they were directly detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave observatory. I will talk about the evolution of gravitational wave astronomy: from a theoretical artefact, to a testable prediction, to an exciting new window with which to view the universe. I will discuss the wider applications of this new branch of astronomy within the astronomy and astrophysics communities and the exciting prospects for the future of gravitational wave science in Australia.

Fri, 7 Jul, 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Fri, 7 Jul, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Panel 1 – Communicating and Selling Your Science

Panel members: Jonti Horner (USQ), Anais Möller (ANU), Rebecca Allen (Swinburne), Jack Line (Melbourne)

Questions for the panel:

  • What did you find was the biggest challenge in communicating your science, and how did you overcome that?
  • If you could give one top tip, what would it be?
  • What is your biggest pet peeve when you see others communicating science?

Fri, 7 Jul, 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Fri, 7 Jul, 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Friday Afternoon

T3, 4:00–5:00 p.m. — Transients
Anais MÖLLER, Australian National University

With the advent of wide field surveys, the discovery of optical transients has been on the rise. Observationally, we can define transients as sources that rise from the background, become bright and are detected, and then fade away. They are usually linked to some kind of explosion or catastrophic event. These events can vary on very different time scales: from seconds to months. This talk will give an overview of known optical transients and their diversity. We will discuss how transients are discovered and classified, current transient surveys and the role of multi-messenger astrophysics in this field.

Fri, 7 Jul, 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Fri, 7 Jul, 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑


Sat, 8 Jul

9:00–11:00 a.m. | 11:00–11:30 a.m. | 11:30 a.m. –12:30 p.m. | 12:30–2:00 p.m. | 2:00–3:00 p.m. | 3:00–3:30 p.m. | 3:30–5:00 p.m. | 6:00–7:00 p.m. | 7:00–10:00 p.m.

Sat, 8 Jul, 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Saturday Morning (1)

T4, 9:00–10:00 a.m. — Radio astronomy
Helga DENES, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation/ The Australian National University

In this talk I will briefly discuss the history of radio astronomy, focusing on the important role that Australia played. I will also highlight some of the most interesting current developments in radio astronomy and how these efforts are contributing towards the next generation of telescopes.

T5, 10:00–11:00 a.m. — Galaxy evolution
Rebecca ALLEN, Swinburne University

In the local Universe we see great diversity in the properties of galaxies, but there remains a lot to learn about their evolution and formation. Using space based and large ground based telescopes, we can identify and study galaxies that existed when the Universe was still quite young. We can then assemble samples of galaxies over many epochs to understand how they are evolving with time. In my work, I use the sizes of galaxies to reveal how they grow with time and how their local environment may affect their growth mechanisms. In my talk, I describe the necessary tools to study galaxies with time, and how my results have contributed to the field of galaxy evolution.

Sat, 8 Jul, 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sat, 8 Jul, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Saturday Morning (2)

T6, 11:30 a.m. –12:30 p.m. — Epoch of Reionization
Jack LINE, University of Melbourne

After recombination, the Universe was predominantly neutral hydrogen (HI). During this ‘cosmic dark age’, there was no light being produced, making traditional astronomy impossible. This dead lock was broken when over-densities collapsed into the first luminous sources; as these objects emerged, they began to ionise the surrounding HI. This period of time is known as the epoch of reionsation (EoR), and has never been directly observed. The theory of the EoR is well advanced, being almost simple during the dark ages - given the primordial state of the Universe - but remains untested. How and when did the Universe form the morphologically complex range of galaxies that we see today? What manner of astrophysical objects, be they stars or black holes, existed within the first structures to be born?

In this talk, I will broadly overview the wealth of theoretical, computational, and observational work done to date to understand the EoR. I will also look towards the future, in anticipation of the next generation telescope SKA_LOW, to be built in WA, which promises a golden age for EoR science. I will discuss how Australia is helping to inform SKA_LOW through theoretical work and the path-finder instrument the MWA.

Sat, 8 Jul, 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sat, 8 Jul, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Saturday Afternoon

T7, 2:00–3:00 p.m. — Big Bang cosmology
Yvonne WONG, University of New South Wales

Abstract TBP

Sat, 8 Jul, 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sat, 8 Jul, 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Panel 2 – The Future of Australian Astronomy

a.k.a. Where will the jobs be?

Panel members: Jonti Horner (USQ), Letizia Sammut (Monash), Helga Denes (CSIRO), Yvonne Wong (UNSW)

Questions for the panel:

  • What was the future of astronomy when you were starting your PhD?
  • What do you see as the future of astronomy now?
  • What is the future of Australian astronomy now?

Sat, 8 Jul, 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sat, 8 Jul, 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑


Sun, 9 Jul

10:00–11:00 a.m. | 11:00–11:30 a.m. | 11:30 a.m. –1:00 p.m. | 1:00–2:30 p.m. | 2:30–5:30 p.m.

Sun, 9 Jul, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sunday Morning

T8, 10:00–11:00 a.m. — Indigenous Astronomy: at the crossroads of Science and Culture
Duane HAMACHER, Monash University

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were careful observers of the night sky, noting subtle changes in the positions of the Sun, Moon, and stars and applying that knowledge to navigation, calendars, and food economics. Recent ethnographic fieldwork with Aboriginal and Islander communities shows how subtle changes in the properties of stars, such as their variability, are well known and that atmospheric effects, like Moon haloes and stellar scintillation, are used to predict weather and seasonal change. This talk will explore the crossroads of science in culture by examining the scientific information encoded in Indigenous oral traditions. We will discuss collaborations between astrophysicist and Aboriginal communities, and show how this knowledge can be of mutual benefit.

Sun, 9 Jul, 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sun, 9 Jul, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Panel 3 – How to get the most out of a conference

Panel members: Jack Line (Melbourne), Rebecca Allen (Swinburne), Yvonne Wong (UNSW), Anais Möller (ANU)

Questions for the panel:

  • What was your biggest fear with networking, and how did you overcome it?
  • If you could give one top tip for making the most of a conference, what would it be?
  • Talks v Posters - what are your thoughts?

Sun, 9 Jul, 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

Sun, 9 Jul, 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Day ↑ | Top ↑

HWWS Bus - Kioloa to Canberra

Registration required

2:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. @ ANU Kioloa Campus to ANU University House, via Canberra Airport

A bus service from Kioloa Campus to ANU Main Campus has been organized by the Harley Wood Winter School LOC. Departure and drop-off times for this bus are as follows:

Depart ANU Kioloa Campus @ 2.30pm
Arrive Canberra Airport @ 5pm (approx)
Carry on from there to ANU University House @ 5 ...

More info →